Thursday, June 9, 2011

Work at our New Home

If you're trying to count I'll save you the trouble. We had 120 calf hutches.
 Not only were we trying to get settled into our new home and get into a comfortable routine. We were also getting a lot of little heifer calves adjusted to their new home. It was a lot of work. My parents decided to come visit us in our new home and were looking forward to meeting their new baby grand-daughter for the first time as well.

  They also made plans for my brother Mahlon to stay with us for several months to help with the many things that needed to be done. Like building fences, clearing away all the brush around our buildings and a lot of things that needed fixing up besides all the chores that needed to be done.

  I really looked forward to having them come visit. Even though it had only been a little over two months that I had seen them last, it felt more like several years.

Some of the weaned calves that were moved from their calf hutches to one of the pastures.

20 comments:

Sky said...

my goodness how cute!

Toriz said...

With how you were feeling about your decision to move, I'm not surprised it felt like it had been so long since you'd seen the people you love so much!

Laura said...

The calves are so cute.
Your story has many twists and turns! Am enjoying following along.

Rosemary said...

I have never heard of a calf hutch. The calves and hutches look so cute.

lisa said...

Wow, now that is a lot of calves!

lisa said...

Wow, now that is a lot of calves!

Catherine Anne said...

Love your homestead

jules said...

These pics remind me of growing up on our dairy farm here in Wisconsin.

There is a lot of work on a farm like yours....

Rita said...

Have never heard of or seen a calf hutch and I grew up in Minnesota dairy country with some dairy farmers in the family line. You have me really curious about them. What are they made of? Why are they used?

A Joyful Chaos said...

Rita, Calves are healthier when raised in hutches. We've done it with and without hutches so have plenty of experience both ways.

You can visit www.ezhutch.net for more info.

Magnolia Tea said...

Wow, I love the pictures! I'm a counter, too, so thanks for relieving me of that. lol
Have a great day!

Janie said...

I've never see the hutches used, either. The farmers here just separate the weanlings for awhile. Seems like a good approach to give them individual shelter and food.
In a sense, you were being weaned, too, by being separated from your family for the first time. I'm glad they were coming to visit!

*~*~*~*~Tonia said...

Having moved a ways from my parents I can see how it seems like years in between visits Even when its not been long.
Funny that some people have never heard of Calf Hutches.. I thought those were pretty universal in farming..

from my front porch... said...

Are these calves being raised for veal?

A Joyful Chaos said...

front porch, No, these are not veal calves. Veal never get anything except milk and must be kept indoors in order for them to never get grass or anything else.

Folky Dots said...

One of my favorite things to see is a new calf laying on green grass. So sweet.

Looking forward to hearing how the visit went. :)

Paula said...

Wow- 120? That is amazing! I love farm babies of any kind....

steph said...

Isn't it strange farming is a lot of work, yet it is so relaxing. We are just getting started on our little hobby duck farm:)

Beloved's Bride said...

I see some of my questions have been answered already. Here they just separate the calves as well. For days you can hear them crying for their mommas. Around that time the coyotes come out. Typically if we have a donkey in with the cows it keeps the coyotes away since the donkey runs them off. Did you have a problem with coyotes having them in hutches?

Happy Times said...

So cute!